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What kind of seafood is A langoustine

What kind of seafood is A langoustine

Friends at Delicious Italy entered in a recipe for a dish called Brodetto in the Teach a Man to Fish Sustainable Seafood Event. Brodetto is often made with Scampi or Langoustines.Our fishmonger had an uncommon shipment the other day which we pounced on. Then the question was: what to do with them. My first instinct was to make scampi. That is our English term for a dish comprised of shrimp, garlic, oil and pasta. To the Italians, Scampi is Langoustine. Confused yet?Scampi or Langoustine?Research was clearly in order; first our Langoustines.These tasty decapods are in the same family as Lobsters, Shrimp, and Crawfish all having ten legs. They are the saltwater cousins of the freshwater crawfish known here in the US. Langoustines are most often shipped from the waters around Northern and Southern Europe.One might say its a fine kettle of fish to mean its a confused mess. Another meaning of that term is discussed in this site called World Wide Words. If you like words this site is fun to hop around. Check it out. I consulted the curious resource to find out about another phrase pertaining to this meal.What is the Origin of the Phrase to Warm the Cockles of Your Heart?The phrase, which refers to something creating joy or delight, can be traced to a couple of possible origins. One is their heart shape. Possibly the Cochlea Cordis, an early Latin term used to describe the heart has something to do with it.Once youre done hopping around World Wide Words, imagine hopping mollusks. No, really. These little guys look like tiny little clams with a rounded shape, with a ribbed, often green shell. They have ability to hop around on their large foot.What Exactly is Sustainable Seafood?Do you know Alaska is the only state that has written conservation laws into its Constitution. Nearer my home state, the legislature and fishermen of Rhode Island are engaged in a battle over proposed bans meant to protect dwindling fish stocks. Only a farsighted balancing of environmental protections and legislative attention to the economic impact on fishermen will work. Well see how this goes. Right now the sides look as far apart as the Marianas Trench is deep hows that for an oceanographic reference point?How do we know when were staring at the fish counter and looking at all the varieties available what to purchase and what to avoid? Here are some resources and an interesting article in the SF Chronicle that simplifies the issue in a helpful way. This article includes tips for consumers on determining the source of their fish.Other great resources include the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch Pocket Guides. They even have a downloadable version you can keep on your mobile device.Generally, we dont support unitaskers in the kitchen. A family member usually gives us kitchen tools for Christmas and shellfish scissors were among them last year. Turns out they are perfect for extracting every last bit of meat from small shellfish.A client of mine loves langoustines. I have never eaten langoustines, let alone cooked with them. When in doubt, always refer to Rick Stein. His fish book provides a detailed account of most fish, with photographs to help with the procedures necessary to create a food memory. I was pleasantly surprised how simple and delicious a langoustine dish could be. The only problem for most folk is their price. I have never been disappointed by a Rick Stein recipe. Infact my client commented on how moist and flavorful the langoustine and sauce tasted.A langoustine is a marine crustacean which looks a little like a miniature lobster and a lot like the river dwelling crayfish. Its proper name is Nephrops norvegicus. It can grow up to a foot in length and is prized for its delicious tail meat. Smaller langoustine have their upper parts discarded and their tails used for scampi. Larger langoustine are sold to be cooked whole. Then the meat from the tail and, in larger specimens the claws, is eaten either as part of a more complex dish or straight from the shell. They are a common feature in the traditional French bistro seafood platter and a very important element in Spanish cuisine. Amazingly most langoustine are currently exported from Scotland to continental European markets. Long considered waste and discarded by fishing fleets hungry for white fish catches they are now the mains stay of the fishing economy in some parts of Scotland.